10/28/10

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10/19/10

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10/18/10

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10/15/10

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10/14/10

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10/13/10

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10/1/10

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9/30/10

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9/28/10

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9/27/10

Photo of Oculoplastic Surgeon Dr. Kami Parsa in the Operating Room http://dlvr.it/626z0
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Kami Parsa, MD posted a message http://dlvr.it/61s3D
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Kami Parsa, MD posted a message http://dlvr.it/60zHC

9/24/10

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Kami Parsa, MD posted a message http://dlvr.it/5sC40
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Kami Parsa, MD posted a message http://dlvr.it/5rKFm

9/23/10

Photo of Oculoplastic Surgeon Dr. Kami Parsa in the Operating Room http://dlvr.it/5pB1b
Can I combine a blepharoplasty with Lasik in one surgery? http://dlvr.it/5p2h7
Kami Parsa, MD posted a message http://dlvr.it/5nwGV
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What our Eyelid Surgery Patients are Saying

Dear Dr. Parsa:

I just want to take this time to thank you for everything you have done for me. As you know, when I was first diagnosed with facial paralysis a few months ago, I felt like my life was about to end. After seeing several doctors, you were one of the only ones who spent an hour with me explaining everything that is possible. I have never felt so comfortable with a doctor. I want to thank you for sharing your gift with me, and I feel lucky to have you as my doctor.

Sincerely,
Johnny S.

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What our Eyelid Surgery Patients are Saying

Dear Dr. Parsa:

Words cannot express how thankful and appreciative I am to have found you. I am deeply grateful for you, for your generosity and caring nature as pertaining to my medical condition. As you know, I was apprehensive about having further surgery, but you are and have been reassuring and confident in the type of procedure you would perform in order to fix my eyelid from the beginning. The fact that you are not pushy and gave me the time and space to make the decision on my own allowed me to prepare myself mentally and emotionally, that really made a difference. Besides from that, your continuous generosity made me confident that you were the right doctor for the task at hand. You will never know how appreciative I am of that. I would also like to let you know how pleased I am with the results of the surgery. I have not felt this comfortable in years. My parents are also very grateful since this was my 14th surgery. You have a true gift. Thank you again for your patience, time, concern, and overall care. I pray that God continues to give you strength to help people who truly need life-changing medical procedures.

With much appreciation always,
Sophia P.

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Become a fan of Oculoplastic Surgery  on Facebook
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Kami Parsa, MD posted a message http://dlvr.it/5n2cQ

9/22/10

Photo of Surgery being Performed by Kami Parsa, MD http://dlvr.it/5kznT
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Kami Parsa, MD posted a message http://dlvr.it/5kjbN
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9/21/10

Photo of Oculoplastic Surgeon Dr. Kami Parsa Performing Eye Procedure http://dlvr.it/5gg8S
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Kami Parsa, MD posted a message http://dlvr.it/5gNsL

Can I combine a blepharoplasty with Lasik in one surgery?

Q: Can Lasik surgery be combined with eyelid surgery? I would rather only have one surgery but I want both procedures...Would it be hard to find a doctor who can do both?

A: I typically tell my patients that they need to wait at least 2 to 3 months between having any laser correction surgery and Blepharoplasty. This is because proper time is needed to allow the cornea to stabilize.
Kami Parsa, MD posted a message http://dlvr.it/5fyvG
Picture of Oculoplastic Surgeon Performing Procedure on the Eye http://dlvr.it/5fpZ7
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Kami Parsa, MD posted a photo http://dlvr.it/5fTn9

9/20/10

Photo of Oculoplastic Surgeon Performing Enucleation Procedure http://dlvr.it/5d2kX
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Kami Parsa, MD posted a photo http://dlvr.it/5clcm
Kami Parsa, MD posted a photo http://dlvr.it/5cKmr
Photo from the Operating Room of Oculoplastic Surgeon http://dlvr.it/5c9zs
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Kami Parsa, MD posted a photo http://dlvr.it/5bw2c

9/17/10

What our Eyelid Surgery Patients are Saying

Dear Dr. Parsa:

I was a patient of yours last year, and I want to thank you for your help and fine work. I wanted to wait a while to see how everything went before I wrote, and in appreciation, I want you to have the gift I send along, and to thank you and compliment your staff for such a professional and excellent job they all did. I also thought you might like an update now. Everything came out beautifully, I look wonderful, and I feel so much better. It is amazing how just a small thing can make such an improvement. I will feel much better about my appearance and my self-confidence in that area for years to come. Frankly, I think I will probably feel so much better for the rest of my life that I am extremely happy I decided to do this and cannot imagine now not having done it. I think this one thing was such an improvement. Thank you very much for everything and especially for doing such a concerned and careful job. I was very anxious about the procedure and doing anything like this. I am very glad I chose you. I will keep you posted on everything.

Sincerely,
Jackie L.

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Become a fan of Oculoplastic Surgery  on Facebook
Become a fan of Surgical Friends Foundation on Facebook

9/12/10

Can bleph eyelid surgery be done without anesthesia?

Q: If so, how does it work?

A: Typically most eyelid surgery is performed under local anesthesia. This is the same type of anesthesia that your dentist uses. If a more complex procedure is being performed, we can use local anesthesia with IV sedation or general anesthesia.

9/9/10

What our Eyelid Surgery Patients are Saying

Dear Dr. Parsa:

I just want to take this time to thank you for your kindness and caring ways as a great doctor. You made me feel very comfortable in which, as you know, in the past I was not. We need to have more doctors like yourself in this world. Oh, yes, and I love my eyes of course. Thank you.

Sincerely,
Angela L.

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View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Videos on Youtube
View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Photos on Flickr
Become a fan of Oculoplastic Surgery  on Facebook
Become a fan of Surgical Friends Foundation on Facebook

9/1/10

What our Eyelid Surgery Patients are Saying

Marie and Dr. Parsa:

Thank you so much for all you have done for me. This whole experience has been wonderful, and I love my results.

Love,
Deb P.

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View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Videos on Youtube
View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Photos on Flickr
Become a fan of Oculoplastic Surgery  on Facebook
Become a fan of Surgical Friends Foundation on Facebook

8/30/10

What is a "Botox lift" or "Botox Brow Lift"?

Q: I thought that Botox could make your face sag more, so how is a Botox Lift even possible? How does a Botox Brow lift work?

A: Botox, if placed in the proper position can raise the eye brows a few millimeters. Now this may work for someone who has mild brow ptosis (droop). Now remember that the effects of Botox lasts approximately 3 to 4 months. And if you seek anything longer than that a surgical procedure such as endoscopic brow lift might be necessary.

8/29/10

What our Eyelid Surgery Patients are Saying

Dear Dr. Parsa:
I have been trying to formulate the appropriate way to express my gratitude to you. It is difficult because it is mingled with all the emotions of Gabe’s ordeal that I have been experiencing. The process began with a tremendous amount of fear and anger which I had to disguise for Gabe’s sake. He kept saying that I needed to be positive. It was the only way that he would make it through all of this, and so we did that together, fortunately with some success. Interestingly, as he progressed in his recovery, my emotions welled to the surface and I had several trying weeks as I dealt with the challenge of ridding myself of the image of a brutal stranger beating my child’s face.

I know that time will heal both of us physically and emotionally. And in all of this was you, our wonderful surgeon, skilled in both your medical specialty as well as your ability to offer us your calming and reassuring presence. All that you are and have done for us means more than I can express to you on this page. Know that I will forever be grateful to you for your extraordinary skills and for steering us with care through our crisis.

P.S. If there is ever another family who would benefit from speaking to me or Gabe, please do not hesitate to have them contact me. I would be happy to offer support for anyone in a similar difficult situation.

Sincerely,
Jade S.

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View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Videos on Youtube
View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Photos on Flickr
Become a fan of Oculoplastic Surgery  on Facebook
Become a fan of Surgical Friends Foundation on Facebook

8/26/10

What our Eyelid Surgery Patients are Saying

Dr. Parsa is an amazing doctor who is very skillful at his work and extremely understanding and caring. The whole procedure, from the first day I entered Dr. Parsa’s office for the consultation to the day of the surgery, has proven to be above and beyond my expectations. Thank you to Dr. Parsa and his entire staff, plus the anesthesiologist, David, was a superb anesthesiologist.

Love,
Lisa V.

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View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Videos on Youtube
View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Photos on Flickr
Become a fan of Oculoplastic Surgery  on Facebook
Become a fan of Surgical Friends Foundation on Facebook

8/24/10

Browlift vs Blepharoplasty - which is best for sagging eyelids?

Q: Is a brow lift (forehead lift) better to raise sagging eyelids than a blepharoplasty?

A: Every time I see a new patient in my office for consultation, after listening to their needs & concerns they get a full comprehensive evaluation. At end of the evaluation depending on the patient’s individual anatomy I come up with a customized treatment plan.

Now because of the proximity of the brow to the upper eyelids and variations in anatomy and the aging process, each person will have different contributions to the sagging upper eyelids. Some people will have severe brow droop which is most of the problem and some people may not have any brow droop. So your treatment plan will have to be customized for you.

8/23/10

Picture of Lower Eyelid Reconstruction Surgery

Some of the most dreaded complications of facial plastic surgery are those associated with the eyelids. The eyes and eyelids are very sensitive structures and are not as forgiving. As an oculoplastic surgeon with expertise in plastic surgery around the eye, a majority of Dr. Parsa's referrals are patients who have had previous complications with facial plastic surgery and now require cosmetic and functional correction around the eyelids. Depending on the specific problem, the necessary correction may involve a simple procedure or a complex eyelid reconstruction. Our goal is to regain normal function while maintaining aesthetic outcome.
www.oculoplastic.info (310) 777-8880
www.youtube.com/oculoplasticsurgery
www.facebook.com/drkamiparsa
twitter.com/drkamiparsa
www.plasticsurgerytube.com/OculoplasticSurgery

What our Eyelid Surgery Patients are Saying

Dr. Parsa: 

I want to say to you that not only are you a very skillful, gifted doctor in the work you perform, but you also are blessed with something extra which puts you on a higher plane than other surgeons. I believe this extra special quality which you possess is your intuitiveness and listening abilities. I mean you give wholeheartedly to each and every one of your patients to truly hear their personal concerns when sitting in your presence. I know with me, you often had to hear me babble about nonsense. Yet, you still cared. This quality truly enables you to connect with your patient’s real needs, giving a positive end result. I want to tell you that life is definitely a gift. So, I say thank you Dr. Parsa for the gift you have given me. I sincerely express my appreciation and gratitude for your professional work, care, and passion.

Thank you so much.
Janet B.

-------------------------------------

View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Videos on Youtube
View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Photos on Flickr
Become a fan of Oculoplastic Surgery  on Facebook
Become a fan of Surgical Friends Foundation on Facebook

8/21/10

Eyelid Belpharoplasty Risks, Problems, What to Know in Advance

Q: In preping myself for eyelid blepharoplasty procedure i'd like to know what to expect beforehand.  Am I taking risks? what problems are possible? help me calm down!


A: There are more than 50 different ways to perform an eyelid surgery. Depending on you, your needs and your anatomy your surgeon should come up with a specific treatment plan to meet your needs. Unfortunately some surgeons only know of one or two ways of doing these procedures and they use that on every patient they see.

So I would say make sure you do your homework before choosing an eyelid surgeon because revisional surgery (fixing previously poorly performed surgery) is more challenging and costs much more than primary surgery. Make sure you at least you ask for an oculoplastic surgeon.

What our Eyelid Surgery Patients are Saying

Hi Marie:

I'm soooooooooooooooooooo happy !!!!Thank you so much and  MY VERY BIG THANKS TO Dr Parsa for his magic ! I truly felt cared for and my long trip was priceless in knowing that I was in good hands from the start ! I'm being good- no sun- no swimming - no weed whacking !!!! But, I  thought I'd share a little photo of what I'm coming home to.....my little swimmers ! They have the end of year Banquet this Friday !

Thank you again for all !
Galen

8/19/10

Dr. Kami Parsa's Media Appearances



Dr. Parsa has appeared on numerous media outlets around the world, including CNN, ABC, NBC, CBS, The New York Times and the Miami Herald.

8/17/10

Oculoplastic Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Will my insurance pay for Blepharoplasty?

A: Insurance paying for upper eyelid surgery
There are three criteria that medicare has established and all three need to be documented before your insurance company considers covering the cost of upper eyelid surgery.

1. Documentation of superior visual field loss: This test is performed with each eyelid taped up to prove improvements in the superior visual field after surgery.

2. Documentation of ptosis (eyelid droop) OR dermatochlasia by your surgeon

3. Frontal and side view photographs documenting the presence of ptosis or dermatochlasia.

Now remember each insurance company is different and may have their own rules for qualifications.

8/16/10

What our Eyelid Surgery Patients are Saying

Dear Dr. Parsa:

You are an angel disguised in human form doing God’s friendly work here on Earth. Even while still healing above and beyond my expectation. Thank you for all your care and patience with me.

Sincerely,
Lisa V.

-------------------------------------

View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Videos on Youtube
View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Photos on Flickr
Become a fan of Oculoplastic Surgery  on Facebook
Become a fan of Surgical Friends Foundation on Facebook

8/15/10

Entire Eyelid Surgical Procedures Including Ptosis, Cosmetic & Revisional

8/13/10

Oculoplastic Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Will I be able to close my eyes after eyelid surgery? does the eyelid surgery leave the lids pulled open more so, causing difficulty to close them?

A: Eye closure after blepharoplasty
The eyelids are very delicate. If the blepharoplasty procedure is performed correctly you should have no problems with your blinking or eyelid closure. A major part of my practice is revisional surgery (correcting previous bad surgery) and I see inexperienced doctors taking too much skin which leads to eyelid closure problems.

8/11/10

What our Eyelid Surgery Patients are Saying

Dear Dr. Parsa, Marie, Morgan, and Janet:

Just wanted to say thanks. Dr. Parsa, thanks for your generosity and care above and beyond your call of duty. Marie, thanks for making me feel at home and comfortable. Morgan, thanks for all the phone calls, even when I was not supposed to be there. Janet, you guys are rock stars. Good luck and be well.

Sandra L.

-------------------------------------

View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Videos on Youtube
View our Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Photos on Flickr
Become a fan of Oculoplastic Surgery  on Facebook
Become a fan of Surgical Friends Foundation on Facebook

8/9/10

HAITI MISSION TRIP : SURGICAL FRIENDS FOUNDATION

Because of the devastating earthquake that occurred in Haiti, thousands of people have lost their lives. The country is in desperate need of continuous help. Surgical Friends Foundation is planning its first trip to Haiti to see patients at Hope Hospital in June 2010. Here is how you can help:

8/5/10

Oculoplastic Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Can eye bags and fat be removed without blepharoplasty?
I have had two eyelifts on the lower lid and there is not a lot of elasticity left. However, I have fat under one eye and would like to if possible have it removed. Is this possible?

A: Multiple lower lid surgeries
The most important advise for you at this time is to make sure you are seen by an Oculoplastic surgeon. I agree with others, It is impossible to answer your question without examining you first. Make sure you do your research before having any other surgery.

8/3/10

Revisional Ptosis surgery for Afican American Female


Eyelid Ptosis occurs when the muscles that raise the eyelid are not strong enough to do so properly. It can affect one eye or both eyes and is more common in the elderly, as muscles in the eyelids may begin to deteriorate. gd

Ptosis wmay be caused by damage/trauma to the muscle which raises the eyelid, or damage to the nerve (3rd cranial nerve (oculomotor nerve)) which controls this muscle. Such damage could be a sign or symptom of an underlying disease such as diabetes mellitus, a brain tumor, and diseases which may cause weakness in muscles or nerve damage, such as myasthenia gravis. Exposure to the toxins in some snake and insect venoms, such as that of the black mamba, may also cause this effect.

7/23/10

What our Patient's are Saying

Hi Marie:
I'm soooooooooooooooooooo happy !!!!Thank you so much and MY VERY BIG THANKS TO Dr Parsa for his magic ! I truly felt cared for and my long trip was priceless in knowing that I was ingood hands from the start ! I'm being good- no sun- no swimming - no weed whacking !!!! But, I thought I'd share a little photo of what I'm coming home to.....my little swimmers ! They have the end of year Banquet this Friday !
Thank you again for all !
Galen

7/20/10

Your Cosmetic Surgery Questions Answered

Q: I have a pre-op appointment on May 12th for Blepharoplasty. I'm a little scared about doing this. I don't want to regret it if things don't turn out good. I'm also afraid of the dry eye problem that can occur. My eye doctor says that I don't have extreme dry eyes. but I feel they are dry at times. Will they become extremely dry after surgery, for the rest of my life?

A: Every patient I see in my practice as part of their initial consultation and evaluation is tested for dry eyes. If your plastic surgeon does not routinely do this, it is because they are not familiar with these tests. That’s why it is important to make sure the surgeon operating on your eyes is an oculoplastic surgeon.

7/15/10

The History and Development of Reconstructive Surgery


I just wanted to share this amazing news with everyone. Surgeons' Hall Museum in Edinburgh UK is having an exhibit on the history and development of reconstructive surgery from Aug 5 2010 to April 2011. They have chosen Surgical Friends Foundation as one of the reconstructive surgery foundations to exhibit. Our Video on Elena and Andressa will be featured continuously for 8 months. It is a privilege and honor to be presented in this prestigious exhibit.

To many more beautiful possibilities in the future.

Peace & Love

please visit this website: http://www.museum.rcsed.ac.uk/content/content.aspx

7/13/10

Dr. Kami Parsa's Honors, Awards and Achievements

Honors Citation: Ophthalmology Clerkship

Honors Citation: General Surgery Clerkship

Honors Citation: Family Medicine Clerkship

Letter of Commendation: General Surgery Clerkship

Letter of Commendation: Gross Anatomy Course

Award Reception: General Surgery Clerkship

President of Project Case Report (1999- 2000)

USC-Baxter Research Fellowship Grant (1999)

President of American Medical Student Association, USC Chapter (1997-98)

Aull Scholarship, USC School of Medicine (1997)

Student Research Fellowship Grant (1997)

Linden Scholarship, USC School of Medicine (1996)

Cum Laude Graduate, UCLA

President of Phi Sigma Biology Honor Society, UCLA chapter (1995-96)

Dean's Honor List 7 quarters, UCLA

Doheny Eye Institute Resident Research Award ARVO 2003

Nesbaurn Award for Best Clinical Research Paper by a Resident 2003

Board of Directors. University of Miami School of Medicine Project ARPAN :
Mission to deliver medical and surgical care to developing countries.
First mission - Dec. 2005 Deesa, India

What our Patient's are Saying

Dr. Parsa:
I want to say to you that not only are you a very skillful, gifted doctor in the work you perform, but you also are blessed with something extra which puts you on a higher plane than other surgeons. I believe this extra special quality which you possess is your intuitiveness and listening abilities. I mean you give wholeheartedly to each and every one of your patients to truly hear their personal concerns when sitting in your presence. I know with me, you often had to hear me babble about nonsense. Yet, you still cared. This quality truly enables you to connect with your patient’s real needs, giving a positive end result. I want to tell you that life is definitely a gift. So, I say thank you Dr. Parsa for the gift you have given me. I sincerely express my appreciation and gratitude for your professional work, care, and passion.
Thank you so much.
Janet

7/3/10

Haiti. Hopital Espoir July 1st 2010 Surgical Friends

7/2/10

In Airport Haiti. Andrew Ordon and Kami Parsa. Surgical Friends Mission Trip

7/1/10

Haiti orphanage July 1st

6/29/10

Help Haiti with Surgical Friends Foundation

Because of the devastating earthquake that occurred in Haiti, thousands of people have lost their lives. The country is in desperate need of continuous help. Surgical Friends Foundation is planning its first trip to Haiti to see patients at Hope Hospital in June 2010. Here is how you can help:

Text SFF to 85944 to donate 10 dollars (charged to your cell phone)

* $10 donation will pay for 20 IV bags needed for dehydrated children

* $50 donation will pay for antibiotic treatment needed for 5 children

* $250 donation will pay for one child’s surgery

* $1000 sponsors one surgeon for a mission trip

For more information or to make a donation http://surgicalfriends.org/trips/haiti/

Thank you!

6/27/10

What our Patient's are Saying

Dear Dr. Parsa:
I have been trying to formulate the appropriate way to express my gratitude to you. It is difficult because it is mingled with all the emotions of Gabe’s ordeal that I have been experiencing. The process began with a tremendous amount of fear and anger which I had to disguise for Gabe’s sake. He kept saying that I needed to be positive. It was the only way that he would make it through all of this, and so we did that together, fortunately with some success. Interestingly, as he progressed in his recovery, my emotions welled to the surface and I had several trying weeks as I dealt with the challenge of ridding myself of the image of a brutal stranger beating my child’s face.

I know that time will heal both of us physically and emotionally. And in all of this was you, our wonderful surgeon, skilled in both your medical specialty as well as your ability to offer us your calming and reassuring presence. All that you are and have done for us means more than I can express to you on this page. Know that I will forever be grateful to you for your extraordinary skills and for steering us with care through our crisis.

P.S. If there is ever another family who would benefit from speaking to me or Gabe, please do not hesitate to have them contact me. I would be happy to offer support for anyone in a similar difficult situation.
Sincerely,
Jade

6/24/10

Patient Before and After

6/22/10

Videos of Eyelid Surgery in High Speed

6/20/10

Your Cosmetic Surgery Questions Answered

Q: Surgery for right eyelid ptosis?

A: Dear Ray There are multiple techniques available to fix ptosis (droopy eyelid). If you have that much blockage of your visual field you will need revisional surgery. Make sure you look for someone who has experience doing this kind of surgery.

6/19/10

What our Patient's are Saying

Dear Dr. Parsa:
I was a patient of yours last year, and I want to thank you for your help and fine work. I wanted to wait a while to see how everything went before I wrote, and in appreciation, I want you to have the gift I send along, and to thank you and compliment your staff for such a professional and excellent job they all did. I also thought you might like an update now. Everything came out beautifully, I look wonderful, and I feel so much better. It is amazing how just a small thing can make such an improvement. I will feel much better about my appearance and my self-confidence in that area for years to come. Frankly, I think I will probably feel so much better for the rest of my life that I am extremely happy I decided to do this and cannot imagine now not having done it. I think this one thing was such an improvement. Thank you very much for everything and especially for doing such a concerned and careful job. I was very anxious about the procedure and doing anything like this. I am very glad I chose you. I will keep you posted on everything.
Sincerely,
Jackie

6/15/10

Dr. Kami Parsa's Credentials

Surgical Training
• University of Miami Bascom Palmer Eye Institute
Fellowship: Oculoplastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Ranked #1 fellowship by U.S. News & World Report
• University of Southern California Doheny Eye Institute
Residency: Ophthalmology
Internship
• University of California , Los Angeles UCLA
Internship
Education
• University of Southern California School of Medicine
Doctor of Medicine
• University of California , Los Angeles UCLA
Bachelor of Science in Biology, Cum Laude
Academic Appointments
• Assistant Clinical Professor: USC Keck School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology.
• Clinical Fellow: University of Miami School of Medicine

6/13/10

Patient Testimonial

Marie,
You are a real asset to Dr. Parsa’s practice, making each patient feel truly special. Your sweet and cheery personality reminds me of a beautiful rose.
Warmest regards,
Lisa

6/12/10

Patient Before and After


6/11/10

Your Cosmetic Surgery Questions Answered

Q: How long does an upper Eyelid surgery usually take?



A: Typically, an upper eyelid blepharoplasty takes about an hour. You need to make sure you are comfortable with the surgeon operating on you and if you are having eyelid surgery the surgeon should be an oculoplastic surgeon. Hope this helps.

6/8/10

Glossary of Oculoplastic Terms - B

B cell lymphoma: Types of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma affecting B cells. It develops more frequently in immune compromised individuals.

Basal cell carcinoma: Most common type of skin cancer. A slow-growing, malignant, but usually non-metastasizing epithelial neoplasm of the epidermis or hair follicles, most commonly arising in sun damaged skin of the elderly and fair skinned.

Basal cell nevus syndrome: A syndrome of myriad basal cell nevi with the development of multiple basal cell carcinomas in adult life. These patients need to be followed closely for the development of basal cell carcinoma.

Benign mixed tumor: Neoplasm of epithelial and myoepithelial differentiation, varied architectural and cytologic features and mucoid, myxoid or chondroid stroma.

Blepharochalasis: A congenital or acquired condition characterized by undue looseness or pendulousness of the eyelid skin due to an abnormality or deficiency of elastic fibers. This is an idiopathic condition.

Blepharoplasty: Blepharo = eyelid + Plasty = to change. An operation performed to remove excess skin, muscle or fat from the eyelids to create a more youthful appearance. This procedure needs to be customized and individualized for the patient. The art of blepharoplasty has changed significantly in the past 10 years. Today the goal of the operation is to create a more natural look based on each patient's individual needs.

Blepharoptosis: Drooping of the upper eyelid.

Blepharospasm: Involuntary spasmodic contraction of the orbicularis oculi muscle.

Blowout fractures: Bone fractures caused by direct trauma to the globe, which leads to an increase in intraorbital pressure and decompression via fracture of the orbital floor.

Blue nevus: A dark blue or blue-black nevus covered by smooth skin and formed by heavily pigmented spindle-shaped or dendritic melanocytes in the reticular dermis.

Botox: A neurotoxin protein produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. It is used in minute doses both to treat painful muscle spasms, and as a cosmetic treatment. In cosmetic facial rejuvenation it allows paralysis of the affected muscle to temporarily eliminate static wrinkles. The effects of Botox typically last about 90 days. 

Bowen disease: A form of intraepidermal carcinoma characterized by the development of slowly enlarging pinkish or brownish papules or eroded plaques covered with a thickened horny layer. Microscopically, there is dyskeratosis with large round epidermal cells that contain large nuclei and pale-staining cytoplasm and are scattered through all levels of the epidermis.

Brow lift: Operation to elevate the eyebrows.

Brow ptosis: Droopy eyebrow caused by heavy tissue above the eye; it can obstruct vision and result in fatigue caused by the effort required to raise this tissue out of the way.

Buccal mucus membrane graft:  A type of mucosal graft from the lips; commonly used to reconstruct the fornices in situations that the patient lacks normal tissue from previous trauma, injury or birth defect.

Bulbar conjunctiva: The thin, clear tissue over the sclera, which is the white part of the eyeball.

6/7/10

Periocular aging and the changes associated with it

Smoking, sun damage, genetics, stretching from swelling, and the wear and tear from chronic rubbing and blinking all contribute to changes around the eyelids as we age.

Skin changes:
Around our mid-30s the skin around the eyelid starts to thin and lose its elasticity. Slowly this can result in excess skin in the upper eyelids which will cover the crease. The term dermatochalasia, which means excessive loose skin, is used to describe this condition.

Orbicularis oculi: As mentioned previously, this circumferential muscle is responsible for eyelid closure. Stretching of this muscle with time also contributes to the overhanging skin. It is the chronic use of this muscle, combined with squinting and sun damage which result in the static wrinkles we see around the eyes termed “crows feet.” There are two types of wrinkles, static and dynamic. Dynamic wrinkles only appear when we are using that specific muscle. For example, if you were to stand in front of a mirror and actively raise your brows you will see dynamic wrinkles in your forehead from activity of the frontalis muscle. Static wrinkles, on the other hand, are present at all times, even when the muscle is at rest. Botox is a neurotoxin and a paralytic agent that acts by inhibiting the action of those specific muscles and thus temporarily (three to five months) decreases static wrinkles. Facial fat and volume: As we age, the facial

Facial fat and volume: As we age, the facial fat begins to absorb resulting in volume loss in the face. Around the eyes, the loss of midface fat can contribute significantly to the lower eyelid “bags,” and this may be the primary reason they are formed. In the past 10 years most of the modern techniques in periocular rejuvenation take into account this concept of volume loss. Modern techniques in volume replacement include injection of synthetic materials such as Restylane and Juvederm, which are hyaluronic acid products lasting nine to 12 months. An alternative is injection of the patient’s own fat after a small amount of liposuction; this fat injection lasts a lifetime. It should also be mentioned that soft tissue around the eyes descends with time due to gravity.

Septum: This structure can weaken over time, resulting in herniation of orbital fat and also contributing to the lower eyelid “bags.”

Orbital fat: Not only the orbital fat pockets can herniate through a weakened septum but they too can be partially absorbed and with time give rise to a gaunt and “hollowed” look. Older surgical techniques would remove the excess herniated fat, resulting in a worsening of the “hollowed look.” (Pictured below is a patient who had aggressive fat removal 20 years ago which resulted in the hollowed appearance.) Unfortunately many “old school” surgeons are unwittingly contributing to an epidemic of post-blepharoplasty hollowness.



Figure 1 — A 67 year old female who underwent aggressive
blepharoplasty with fat removal 18 years ago. As you can see there
is significant post-operative hollowness around the eyes which
makes the patient look older and “emaciated.”

Patient Before and After

6/3/10

My Experience Having Ptosis Surgery


Ptosis, pronounced toe-sis, is the medical term for drooping of the upper eyelids. The droopy eyelid can be mild to severe. People who have ptosis may complain that people tell them they look “tired or lazy.” Because of a constant effort to raise the eyelids it is not uncommon to also complain of fatigue and tension headaches.

Patient Testimonial

Dear Dr. Parsa:
Words cannot express how thankful and appreciative I am to have found you. I am deeply grateful for you, for your generosity and caring nature as pertaining to my medical condition. As you know, I was apprehensive about having further surgery, but you are and have been reassuring and confident in the type of procedure you would perform in order to fix my eyelid from the beginning. The fact that you are not pushy and gave me the time and space to make the decision on my own allowed me to prepare myself mentally and emotionally, that really made a difference. Besides from that, your continuous generosity made me confident that you were the right doctor for the task at hand. You will never know how appreciative I am of that. I would also like to let you know how pleased I am with the results of the surgery. I have not felt this comfortable in years. My parents are also very grateful since this was my 14th surgery. You have a true gift. Thank you again for your patience, time, concern, and overall care. I pray that God continues to give you strength to help people who truly need life-changing medical procedures.
With much appreciation always,
Sophia

Patient Before and After

Upper eyelid blepharoplasty & Trans bleph endotine browlift

Glossary of Oculoplastic Terms - A

Abscess: A circumscribed collection of purulent exudate appearing in an acute or chronic, localized infection, caused by tissue destruction and frequently associated with swelling and other signs of inflammation and pain.

Abducens nerve:
Cranial nerve # 6. Innervates the lateral rectus, which abducts the eye (moves the eye out); located in the superior orbital fissure.

Accessory nerve:
Cranial nerve # 11. Controls the muscles of the neck and overlaps with functions of the vagus nerve; located in the jugular foramen.

Acrochordons: A polypoidal outgrowth of both epidermis and dermal fibrovascular tissue; also known as a skin tag.

Acropachy: subperiosteal new bone formation.

Actinic keratosis: A pre-malignant warty lesion occurring on the sun exposed skin of the face or hands in older fair skinned people.

Adenocarcinoma: A malignant neoplasm of epithelial cells in a glandular or gland-like pattern.

Adenoid cystic carcinoma:
A histologically defined type of carcinoma characterized by round, gland-like spaces or cysts bordered by layers of epithelial cells without intervening stroma.

Adenoma: An ordinarily benign neoplasm of epithelial tissue in which the tumor cells form glands or gland-like structures in the stroma; usually well circumscribed, tending to compress rather than infiltrate or invade adjacent tissue.

Adipose tissue: Fatty tissue.

Adnexa: Appendages of the eyeball, including the soft tissue, muscles and eyelids.

Afferent pupillary defect: A condition of the eye where the pupil does not constrict appropriately to the level of light reaching it. It is very important in the evaluation of optic nerve function.

Albright syndrome: Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia with irregular brown patches of cutaneous (skin) pigmentation and endocrine dysfunction, especially precocious puberty in girls.

Angiotensin converting enzyme: An enzyme that catalyses the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor.

Ankyloblepharon: Fusion of the eyelids to each other along the lid margins.

Annulus of Zinn:
A ring of fibrous tissue surrounding the optic nerve at its entrance at the apex of the orbit. It is the origin for five of the six extraocular muscles.

Anophthalmic socket: An eye socket that lacks an eyeball.

Anophthalmos: Congenital absence of all tissues of the eyes.

Apert syndrome: Disorder characterized by craniosynostosis and syndactyly; associated with hearing loss; mental retardation is a variable feature.

Arcus marginalis: Collection of fibrous tissue where the orbital septum meets the orbital rim.

Arteriovenous fistulas: An abnormal communication between an artery and vein, usually resulting in the formation of an arteriovenous aneurysm.

Arthritis giant cell: Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a type of vasculitis or arteritis, a group of diseases whose typical feature is inflammation of blood vessels.

Aspergillosis: A type of fungal infection. Usually affects immune compromised hosts.

Asian Blepharoplasty: Cosmetic eyelid surgery for Asians. This procedure is usually done to decrease upper eyelid fullness and reduce the epicanthal fold that is common in Asians.

6/2/10

What you Need to Know about Revisional Eyelid Surgery

Revisional surgery is surgical correction of previous poorly performed surgery. Some of the most dreaded complications of facial plastic surgery are those associated with the eyelids. This usually happens when the surgeon is not experienced or familiar with the delicate anatomy around the eyelids. The field of oculoplastic surgery focuses on cosmetic, reconstructive,and revisional surgery around the eyes. It is important to consider this when referring a patient for cosmetic surgery. Depending on the specific problem, the necessary correction may involve a simple procedure or a complex eyelid reconstruction. The goal of revisional surgery is to regain normal function while maintaining aesthetic outcome.

The most common complaint that is referred for revisional surgery is the inability to close the eyes completely after previous cosmetic surgery. This problem usually happens when excess tissue and skin were removed during the previous surgery. Depending on the severity of the case, there are several procedures which can be done or combined to achieve the desired functional and cosmetic outcome. For example, skin from behind the ear, which very closely matches the texture of eyelid skin can be harvested and used to raise the eyelid. The mid-face can also be elevated by suspension sutures to raise the lower eyelid. The conjunctiva can be elevated by borrowing mucosal tissue from the mouth.

Although subtle, the natural youthful eyelid is V-shaped at the corners. The rounded corners of the eyelids after some cosmetic eyelid surgery is an artificial “operated appearance.” The rounded corners are not only a cosmetic problem for the patient, but they also can interfere with normal blink dynamics. The patient usually complains of tearing or dry eyes. This problem can be reversed by a special surgical technique on an outpatient basis. Postoperative hollowness can be revised by placement or injection of fat into the eyelid or orbit.

6/1/10

Eyelid Ptosis Correction Surgery


Ptosis, pronounced toe-sis, is the medical term for drooping of the upper eyelids. The droopy eyelid can be mild to severe. People who have ptosis may complain that people tell them they look “tired or lazy.” Because of a constant effort to raise the eyelids it is not uncommon to also complain of fatigue and tension headaches.

The most common reason for ptosis is acquired ptosis , which develops as we age. This is due to disinsertion of the tendon that holds the eyelid up in a normal anatomic position. Another cause is congenital ptosis , which happens when a child is born with droopy eyelids. This is rather an urgent medical condition for the child and surgery may be needed to prevent permanent loss of vision in the affected eye. Other rare causes of ptosis include myogenic ptosis from conditions such as Myasthenia gravis, neurogenic ptosis , due to third nerve palsy and mechanical ptosis from tumors or trauma.

5/29/10

Your Cosmetic Surgery Questions Answered

Q: A friend mentioned getting Transconjunctival blepharoplasty. What does this mean? Is it better than traditional eyelift surgery? I'm 52 and would like to help my under eye bags.

A: We are as individualized as our finger prints. That’s why a treatment for your lower eyelid surgery needs to start with you in mind. By that I mean there are multiple techniques available to operate on the lower eyelids and what works for your friend will not necessary work for you. Unfortunately some surgeons know of only few techniques and they use them on everyone they see. That’s why when choosing an eyelid surgeon, make sure they have experience in this field and at least they are oculoplastic surgeons.

Transconjunctival blepharoplasty is a surgical technique that the incision is made on the inside for access to the orbital fat. In the old days, all surgeons would just remove fat to decrease the bulkiness of the lower lid bags. The problem with doing that is that it can lead to post operative “hollowness” and does not really address the problem. Our newer techniques replaces and or repositions the fat to give you a natural not artificial look.

Patient Testimonial

To Dr. Parsa and staff:
You guys are the greatest, from you Dr. Parsa to Marie, the nurses, the anesthesiologist, and everyone, who assisted me for my surgery. Thanks a million for the hospitality, professionalism, and overall service we received.
Sincerely,
Lauren

5/26/10

What determines if an upper eyelid blepharoplasty is covered by insurance or Medicare?

The following three criteria are needed by Medicare and most insurance companies to consider an upper eyelid blepharoplasty a medical necessity, known as a functional versus [or rather than] a cosmetic procedure:

1. Documentation by the clinician of the diagnosis of dermatochlasia (excess skin) or ptosis (droopy upper eyelids).

2. Pre-operative photographs of the patient.

3. Documented improvement of more then 12 degrees in superior visual field with the eyelids taped compared to the eyelids untaped.

5/24/10

Surgical Friends Foundation Preparing to Launch Educational Video Portal

We are very close to launching our new surgery video portal. This educational video portal is the first of its kind and will have all the functionalities of a You-tube. The portal is created to allow surgeons from around the world to upload their latest surgery videos online so it can be used as an educational tool. We believe that a solid education is the only way to address the global health care problems. *If you teach someone to fish they will never go hungry*

5/23/10

Patient Testimonial

Dear Dr. Parsa:
I want to thank you for the consultation you gave me this past week regarding my previous surgeries and potential future surgeries to correct what was done.
I appreciate your honesty, your kindness, and your generosity. Although your suggestion of waiting was hard to hear, I know in my heart it was the best choice for me. My life has not been an easy one since my last surgery, and I want to thank you for giving me hope for the future.
Sincerely,
Mary

5/21/10

Surgical Friends Foundation Mission Trip Debriefing - Angkor Hospital for Children, Cambodia


Dr. Parsa in the operating room with Cambodian surgeons.

Surgical Friends Foundation Update

Surgical Friends Foundation is excited to get ready for operating
on Patient Laura Gill on June 11th . Laura was born with a congenital
facial paralysis on the right side of her face. She lost her job and her
medical insurance a few years ago. She has not been able to find a new job
because of her illness. She cannot close her right eye because facial
paralysis. Se is constantly troubled by tearing, irritated and infected
right eye. We are excited to operate on her for free and get her started on
her new life.

5/20/10

Surgical Friends Foundation Mission Trip Debriefing - Angkor Hospital for Children, Cambodia


From left: Dr. Parsa, Dr. Phara, and Angkor Children’s Hospital staff with a 5 year old patient before her surgery. One of the most rewarding parts of this trip was to establish a long term relationship with the local doctors. Dr. Phara is one of the local surgeons that we worked with.

- Kami Parsa, MD

AMAZING! 2 hr Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery in 2 min


In the past 10 years the art of Plastic Surgery Eyelids and Cosmetic Surgery Eyes has undergone dramatic changes. With advancements in medical knowledge and surgical techniques we have seen an emergence of sub-specialization. The anatomy around the eyes and orbit is both delicate and complex. An oculoplastic surgeon has training in both Ophthalmology and Plastic Reconstructive Surgery. The specialty of Oculoplastics is an art that combines the meticulous detailed microsurgical techniques of ophthalmology with the aesthetic understanding of plastic surgery.

Your Cosmetic Surgery Questions Answered

Q: Eyelid surgery recovery?

A: For most eyelid surgeries I would say five to seven days is sufficient to be presentable to go back to work. Some patients heal much faster then others. The newer techniques we use are usually minimally invasive with quick recovery.

5/19/10

Surgical Friends Foundation Mission Trip Debriefing - Angkor Hospital for Children, Cambodia


Dr. Phara, a Cambodian surgeon at Angkor Children’s Hospital, showing a sign of gratitude for some of the donations given by Surgical Friends Foundation.

- Kami Parsa, MD

Surgical Friends Foundation Mission Trip Debriefing - Angkor Hospital for Children, Cambodia


On January 1 - 11, 2010 I traveled to Cambodia with Surgical Friends Foundation for a surgical mission trip. There I, with four other volunteer surgeons, operated on 25 children with congenital facial deformities and some land mine victims. The picture above was taken at 5:45 am, right before sunrise, at Angkor Watt temple. This is one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever seen. Yet the poverty of their country is unimaginable; an average worker in Cambodia makes less than $2 per day.

- Kami Parsa, MD

5/18/10

Patient Testimonial

Dear Dr. Parsa:
Thank you for everything you and your team has done for me. I am forever grateful for your help and expertise. You are simply the best. You gave me my life back. I cannot thank you enough.
Kindest regards,
Laurie



5/17/10

What You Should Know about Ptosis

1) What are the common causes of ptosis (droopy eyelids)?
The most common reason for ptosis is acquired ptosis , which develops as we age. This is due to disinsertion of the tendon that holds the eyelid up in a normal anatomic position. Another cause is congenital ptosis , which happens when a child is born with droopy eyelids. This is rather an urgent medical condition for the child and surgery may be needed to prevent permanent loss of vision in the affected eye. Other rare causes of ptosis include myogenic ptosis from conditions such as Myasthenia gravis, neurogenic ptosis , due to third nerve palsy and mechanical ptosis from tumors or trauma.

2) Why is it urgent to see a doctor when my child has droopy eyelids?

In order for the visual system to develop normally, each eye needs to receive the visual information independently. In other words if the child has droopy eyelids, this will result in blockage of the visual information to the brain, thus leading to irreversible poor vision. Therefore it is important to surgically raise the eyelids to prevent permanent loss of vision

3) How is this procedure done on my child?

All surgeries for ptosis are performed in an outpatient basis. This means the child will have nothing to eat after midnight before surgery and the surgery will be done in the morning with the child going home the same day. The surgery will vary depending on the type of ptosis which is determined by Dr. Parsa on the initial exam. In general most children with congenital ptosis will need a form of sling procedure. The sling is used to raise the eyelid to the correct level.

4) What are the post operative instructions for my child?
The first 24 hours after surgery use ice packs or frozen peas over the eyelids as much as possible, this is to decrease the post operative swelling. Children's Tylenol should be sufficient to address any pain. You will be given an antibiotic ointment which should be applied to the incision site 3 times a day for one week. The first post operative visit will be a week after surgery. Post operative swelling for a few weeks is normal. The sutures used are absorbable and will not need to be removed.

5) When can my child go back to school?
Typically the child will be able to go back to school after one week of rest.

6) I notice and I am told by others that I always look tired, is there anything that could be done for this?
Droopy eyelids can give the false impression that you are tired. Raising the eyelid will give a more awake and alert, youthful appearance.

7) Does my insurance cover this procedure?

The insurance should cover most children with ptosis because of its urgency. However on adults a visual field test is performed to determine how much of the superior vision is affected by the ptosis.

8) What type of anesthesia is used?
In children the procedure is performed under general anesthesia. In adults most eyelid surgery can be performed under local anesthesia. If desired, local anesthesia with sedation can be performed. This type of anesthesia, also known as Monitored Anesthesia Care ( MAC ), is performed by an anesthesiologist. The main advantages of this anesthesia are: (1) it does not require putting a breathing tube in the throat, (2) it does not require a breathing machine, (3) the recovery is much faster, (4) there is less nausea after surgery. All of these elements translate into greater comfort and safety.

During MAC anesthesia, an intravenous needle is placed into one of the veins of the arm or hand. Relaxing medication is given to make the patient fall asleep. The amount of medication is adjusted as needed. After the patient is asleep, numbing medicine is placed in the skin of the area that is being operated on. During the procedure the patient is unaware of anything going on and cannot hear anything, yet he or she is breathing normally.

Lower Eyelid Bags and Dark Circles

310.777.8880
Photo of Oculoplastic Surgeon Dr. Kami Parsa Performing Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery

Eyelid Surgery Blepharoplasty is one of the most common Eyelid Cosmetic Surgery procedures performed in Facial Plastic Surgery. Our eyes are one of the first places that show signs of aging. As we age we develop redundant skin on the eyelids which unfortunately makes us look tired. Eyelid Surgery Blepharoplasty which is a simple outpatient procedure can reverse these changes and restore a more youthful and rested appearance.
Watch Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Videos on Youtube
465 N. Roxbury Dr. Suite 1001 Beverly Hills, CA 90210

5/14/10

The History of Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery

The first recorded documentation of blepharoplasty was in the first century AD , when Aulus Cornelius Celsus described the excision of skin for “relaxed upper eyelids” in De Re Medica. The term blepharoplasty dates back to 1817, when a German physician Von Graefe described a technique for repairing deformities caused by resection of cancer in the eyelids. In 1907, Conrad Miller wrote Cosmetic Surgery and the Correction of Featural Imperfections, the first book of cosmetic surgery. The second edition of this book, published in 1924, contained diagrams of incisions for upper and lower eyelid surgery. From the late 1940’s to even as recent as today, orbital fat removal had been an important part of this procedure. In the past 10 years, a new paradigm has emerged in periocular rejuvenation where advanced customized techniques allow re-establishment of youthful characteristics by relying less on removal of fat and more on restoration. The goal is to still look like you, just better.

5/13/10

Photo of Dr. Kami Parsa Performing Upper Eyelid Surgery

310.777.8880
Photo of Oculoplastic Surgeon Dr. Kami Parsa Performing Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery

Lower eyelid “bags” and “dark circles” are two of the most common reasons patients see me for a Eyelid Cosmetic Surgery consultation. Each patient will have a different story and presentation, although most patients have the same common complaint, “over the past few years I’ve noticed these dark circles and bags, which I didn’t have before, and they make me look and feel tired”. Another common complaint is that “I’m tired of people telling me I look tired”.
Watch Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Videos on Youtube
465 N. Roxbury Dr. Suite 1001 Beverly Hills, CA 90210

Patient Testimonial

Dear Dr. Parsa and staff:
It is with sincere appreciation that I submit to you this thank you card. Your staff was patient and extremely helpful. I will always be grateful for the compassion, kindness, and understanding that Dr. Parsa showed me during my time in the office. With the strenuous, hectic, and mentally demanding career of a physician, it is comforting to know that there are doctors out there who care and listen to the patient to make them feel comfortable. Thank you so much.
A grateful patient,
Katty

5/11/10

Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery Videos



It has been said that “the eyes are the portal to the soul.” Every time we meet and converse with someone the first thing we notice about them as we make eye contact are their eyes. The anatomical contour and emotional changes of the eyelids and periorbital region play an important role in maintaining facial harmony through expression of human character, mood and feelings. Changes associated with an aging eyelid can project an inaccurate look of fatigue or lack of vitality despite adequate rest and good health.

Blepharoplasty (Greek blepharo = eyelid + plasty = to change or mold) can be performed for functional or aesthetic reasons, or both. Functional blepharoplasty restores normalcy to an eyelid that has been altered by trauma, infection, inflammation, degeneration, neoplasia or developmental errors. Cosmetic surgery attempts to improve the appearance of tissue or structures that are histologically and functionally normal. In either case, the goal of blepharoplasty is the restoration and rejuvenation of the eyes to give a more rested and natural, youthful look.

5/6/10

Upper Eyelid Blepharoplasty Frequently Asked Questions

1) What is an upper eyelid blepharoplasty (cosmetic eyelid surgery)?
Blepharoplasty (Greek: blepharo = eyelid +plasty = to change) is one of the most common cosmetic procedures performed in facial plastic surgery. Our eyes are one of the first places that show signs of aging. As we age we develop redundant skin on the eyelids which unfortunately makes us look tired. Blepharoplasty which is a simple outpatient procedure can reverse these changes and restore a more youthful and rested appearance.


2) What can blepharoplasty (Cosmetic Eyelid Surgery) achieve?
The eyes will appear more rested and vibrant after cosmetic eyelid surgery. Most often the results are so natural that friends and coworkers will comment on how great you look, without realizing that surgery was performed. The incision for blepharoplasty is hidden in natural creases of the eyelid, and it heals extremely well.


3) What do you mean by customized blepharoplasty?
Many plastic surgeons perform the blepharoplasty procedure in the same manner for all patients. This is like visiting a hairstylist who can who can only cut your hair in one way. The Art of Blepharoplasty needs to be refined and customized for each patient individually. As recent as 10 years ago and even today, excessive orbital fatty tissue was removed as part of the blepharoplasty procedure, resulting in periorbital hollowness and a wasted or ill appearance. Today we know that youthful eyes are open and full. This is why Dr. Parsa customizes the treatment plan for each patient individually to achieve a youthful harmonious outcome.


4) I can’t put my make up on like I used to without it getting all over the place, will cosmetic eyelid surgery help?
Absolutely! This is one of the most common complaints that we hear in our practice. As mentioned previously the redundant skin that develops as we age usually causes the makeup to smear. After surgery most of our patients are not only ecstatic about how they look, but are also thrilled that they don’t have to worry about this problem anymore.


5) Will there be a scar on my eyelids?
The incision on the upper eyelids is made on the eyelid crease, so not only is it hidden, but it also heals very nicely. Scars happen when the surgeon operating on the eyelids is not familiar or does not have much experience with operating on this area. Because of Dr. Parsa’s focus on oculoplastic surgery you can rest assured that you will have an expert with focus on eyes.


6) Does insurance cover this?
Your health insurance may cover the cost of upper eyelid surgery if it is causing problems with your superior visual field. After your initial consultation with Dr. Parsa he can tell you if you may be eligible and if further tests are necessary to determine eligibility.


7) How long does the surgery take?
A typical primary eyelid surgery takes between one to two hours. No patient is ever rushed to achieve the best results.


8) What type of anesthesia is used?
Most eyelid surgery can be performed under local anesthesia. If desired, local anesthesia with sedation can be performed. This type of anesthesia, also known as Monitored Anesthesia Care or MAC, is performed by an anesthesiologist. The main advantages of this anesthesia are: (1) it does not require putting a breathing tube in the throat, (2) it does not require a breathing machine, (3) the recovery is much faster, (4) there is less nausea after surgery. All of these elements translate into greater comfort and safety. During MAC anesthesia, an intravenous needle is placed into one of the veins of the arm or hand. Relaxing medication is given to make the patient fall asleep. The amount of medication is adjusted as needed. After the patient is asleep, numbing medicine is placed in the skin of the area that is being operated on. During the procedure the patient is unaware of anything going on and cannot hear anything, yet he or she is breathing normally.


9) What is recovery like?
Depending on the person’s previous medical history there will be some swelling and bruising around the eyelids for one week. Most patients can return to work after 5 to 7 days. There is minimal eye discomfort after the procedure. Ice packs are recommended for the first 2 days to decrease swelling. Arnica & Bromoline will help reduce swelling and bruising.


10) I am interested! How should I proceed?
If you are considering this procedure we encourage you to schedule a private consultation with Dr. Parsa. During this visit he will listen to your concerns and, after a comprehensive evaluation, will discuss the best management for you. If you are a suitable candidate depending on your gender, ethnicity, and age, a customized procedure will be tailored for you. If you are an out of town patient visiting our Beverly Hills Office, please do not hesitate to contact us to help arrange your travel plans.

Patient Testimonial

Dr. Parsa
Being in the eyecare profession and understanding the delicacy of our eyelid tissues, I knew I could only trust a skilled oculoplastic surgeon to work on my ptotic eyelid because of the intricacy involved with the procedure to best yield symmetrical and natural-looking eyelids. You delivered 100% on the results as discussed during my consultation. The procedure was quick and painless. My eyes don't look as tired as they used to and they look very natural with no visible scar or visible sign of surgery. Thank you for making this a 'walk in the park' experience for me. You are great at what you do!
S.H., Optometrist